Democratising Globalisation’s Demons (Part 2 of 2)

The Daily Opium

The following paper draws on a comparative analysis of two essays written by Joseph E. Stiglitz: The Future of Global Governance (written in 2004 for a conference in Spain; referred to as the “Barcelona” paper) and Democratizing the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank: Governance and Accountability.

Last of two parts.

Climate Change illustrates the profoundly unequal power relations  between states, corporations , and social classes operating at a global level.  Societies of the global "south" , while historically least responsible for the carbon emissions linked to climate change, will suffer the most from its effects.  Climate Change illustrates the profoundly unequal power relations between states, corporations , and social classes operating at a global level. Societies of the global “south” , while historically least responsible for the carbon emissions linked to climate change, will suffer the most from its effects.

The Limits of Critique

Despite his trenchant critiques, Stiglitz runs against the limits of his Keynesian background.  He assumes that neoliberal policies and market fundamentalism are the product of a specific set of institutions, uniquely prescribed by individuals espousing a specific neoliberal ideology, and that their flaws do not stem from deeper contradictions…

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