Comparing decades

  • 1900s. Bad: 1in 5 kids died by age 5. Good: airplanes invented, Einstein’s 1905 papers
  • 1910s. Bad: WWI and Spanish flu epidemic. Good: post-Impressionism movement continues.
  • 1920s. Bad: Prohibition. Alcohol gangs cause lots of violence. Good: Expatriates in Paris.
  • 1930s. Bad: Great Depression. Good: 1939 was a golden year for films.
  • 1940s. Bad: WWII. Good: many great movies.
  • 1950s. Bad: poliomyelitis. Good: rock and roll!
  • 1960s. Bad: social unrest. Good: social upheaval.
  • 1970s. Bad: disco. Good: Classic rock.
  • 1980s: bad: cheesy music, films, and fashion. Good: the cheesy stuff was fun, though.
  • 1990s: bad: AIDS epidemic in full swing, good: lots of great music.
  • 2000s: bad: 2001attacks, Bush. Good: Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter.
  • 2010s: bad: Obamacare, War on Terror not over, bad music, fashion reminiscent of 1990, aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhh!
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Young People Who Can’t Cook

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The sad truth of the 2010s is that more and more young people don’t know how to cook. I have known many families with kids who can’t even turn on a stove. Learning how to cook a nutritious meal is important. It helps us to avoid prepared foods from factories that have lots of preservatives, sugar, and salt. It is also great to have cooking as a hobby since it gives people satisfaction that they created something good.

While in high school, I took an art class in a room that used to be used for Home Economics. There were still some old tan stoves in there that were just part of the scenery. The cabinets were filled with jars of ceramic paint. I loved my classes and the teacher was great.  I did wonder when the last time Home Ec. was offered.

My mother graduated from high school in 1967. She had to take sewing in 7th grade and 8th grade took cooking.  It was great.

I do wish that all kids learned how to sew and cook while in school. It would help kids to learn to make healthy meals for themselves, instead of eating out so much. Also, knowing how to repair a garment is good, so that less clothes get thrown away.

Maine has Amish

I recently learned that Maine has Amish people. Smyrna, Unity, and Fort Fairfield have new communities of Amish coming from other parts of the USA, namely Kentucky and Missouri. Maine must be refreshing for them with how quiet it is.

I am glad that the land is being used by them and not developers. It is a shame that so many old farms and dairies in New England have been developed into shopping centers, McMansions, and other crap.

I do hope the best for these people. Not many tourists head to northern Maine. Most of the tourists are outdoorsy people who enjoy nature and going off the beaten path. Those types should have respect for them. The rest are rich people on their ski vacations. Those should just stay at the ski areas.

I would like to visit the interior of Maine someday. I have been to the coast a few times and I liked it. I have acquaintances from Caribou and some distant relatives in Presque Isle.

Something about Maine’s far north does entice me. It scared the crap out of Henry David Thoreau. After living at Walden Pond in his shack, he wandered up there. He high-tailed it out of there and didn’t look back. Bill Bryson, while trying to complete the Appalachian Trail, backed out with his friend Katz. That part was just too rough. Just my style.

 

Democratising Globalisation’s Demons (Part 2 of 2)

The Daily Opium

The following paper draws on a comparative analysis of two essays written by Joseph E. Stiglitz: The Future of Global Governance (written in 2004 for a conference in Spain; referred to as the “Barcelona” paper) and Democratizing the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank: Governance and Accountability.

Last of two parts.

Climate Change illustrates the profoundly unequal power relations  between states, corporations , and social classes operating at a global level.  Societies of the global "south" , while historically least responsible for the carbon emissions linked to climate change, will suffer the most from its effects.  Climate Change illustrates the profoundly unequal power relations between states, corporations , and social classes operating at a global level. Societies of the global “south” , while historically least responsible for the carbon emissions linked to climate change, will suffer the most from its effects.

The Limits of Critique

Despite his trenchant critiques, Stiglitz runs against the limits of his Keynesian background.  He assumes that neoliberal policies and market fundamentalism are the product of a specific set of institutions, uniquely prescribed by individuals espousing a specific neoliberal ideology, and that their flaws do not stem from deeper contradictions…

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Democratising Globalisation’s Demons (Part 1 of 2)

Very interesting

The Daily Opium

The following paper draws on a comparative analysis of two essays written by Joseph E. Stiglitz: The Future of Global Governance (written in 2004 for a conference in Spain; referred to as the “Barcelona” paper) and Democratizing the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank: Governance and Accountability.

First of two parts.

Mural at a labour day protest in Manila, Philippines. (Photo by CJ Chanco)
 The international labour movement has historically been at the forefront of alter-globalisation protests, challenging mainstream notions of capitalist development with the “neoliberalism turn’s” ever greater assaults on the working class at the turn of the century.

In one of the most celebrated critiques of the flagship institutions of neoliberal globalisation ever penned, the Nobel prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz (2004) makes his point clear at the start of his Barcelona paper: “Unfortunately, economic globalization has outpaced political globalization. We are just beginning to develop an international…

View original post 2,888 more words

Dangerous Food Dyes

Food dyes have been used for many years. The dyes add no nutritional value to food, nor do they enhance their taste. They just make the food look more food more appealing to customers. Few people want to buy processed food that is bland in color.  The dyes help these products fly off the shelves.

Many natural food dyes also exist in products, like beet juice for red and purple,carrot for orange, and many more. There are eight artificial food dyes that are allowed in the United States; some are which are banned in some European countries.

Here is the rainbow of colors commonly used in the United States:

  1. Red #3
  2. Red #40
  3. Yellow #5 (Tartrazine)
  4. Yellow #6
  5. Citrus Red #2
  6. Green #3
  7. Blue #1
  8. Blue #2

Some of these dyes are linked to cancer. Some can also cause behavioral problems in children. Many kids labeled ADHD could actually be reacting to food dyes. Yellow #5 can cause symptoms of IBS.

Many parents of hyperactive children who have taken Red #40 out of their children’s diets noticed a dramatic difference in their child’s behavior. Within minutes of accidentally giving their child something with Red #40 in it, the child may start throwing tantrums and is screaming and running around the place.

Why are these preservatives allowed in the United States and in some other countries? Easy. It’s money. Adding these dyes make the foods cheaper to make, and thus more profit for companies. Also, doctors make money off sick people. Drug companies make millions of dollars on Ritalin, Adderall, and other psychotic drugs given to kids.c

Yet, if these dyes can cause problems in children, why not adults? Many adults claim they have attention deficit disorder, anxiety, insomnia, and depression.  Millions get prescriptions for anxiety meds, especially benzodiazepines; sleeping pills like Ambien, and anti-depressants like Abilify and Zoloft. And maybe, just maybe, some of those people may not even need those pills if they would just give up certain dyes, most likely Red #40–but possibly also Yellow #5 and Yellow #6.

Here are some natural (and SAFE!) food dyes that can be used in foods, and are common in Europe and Asia:

  • Annatto extract–yellow color from a tropical tree
  • Dehydrated beets (beet powder)–red-pink color from beets
  • Canthaxanthin–pink color from mushrooms, crustaceans, trout and salmon, and tropical birds
  • Caramel–brown color made from burnt sugar
  • Carotene–yellow color from carrots
  • Carmine extract (aka Cochineal)–red color derived from a species of beetle that feeds on cacti
  • Sodium copper chlorophyllin–green color from plants and copper
  • Toasted partially defatted cooked cottonseed flour–yellow coloring from cottonseed (may cause allergic reactions)
  • Ferrous gluconate (approved only for ripe olives)–yellowish-grey color from iron
  • Ferrous lactate (approved only for ripe olives)–green color from iron
  • Grape color extract (approved only for nonbeverage food)–purple color from the fruit
  • Grape skin extract (approved only for still carbonated drinks & ades; beverage bases; alcoholic beverages) )–purple color from the fruit
  • Synthetic iron oxide (approved only for sausage casings)–red-brown-black-yellow color from combining iron with oxygen
  • Fruit juice–various colors from various fruits
  • Vegetable juice–various colors from various vegetables
  • Carrot oil–yellow color from carrots
  • Paprika–orange color from the spice
  • Paprika oleoresin–extracted from the spice using toxic solvents
  • Riboflavin–yellow to orange color from plants
  • Saffron –yellow color from the spice
  • Titanium dioxide–white pigment from the mineral
  • Turmeric–yellow color from the spice
  • Turmeric oleoresin–extracted from the spice using toxic solvents

Bieber Arrested

So Justin Bieber got arrested for drag-racing in a residential area, smoking weed and being drunk at the same time. If he was drag-racing in a remote area, then he could just get a slap on the wrist and that would be fine. Yet he was in a thickly settled area and easily could have hit someone. 

I do wonder if he will get trouble for this or not. Fines will mean nothing since he has millions of dollars. Jail time would make him think about what he did. Yet putting him in jail would cost the state of Florida a lot of money, since he’ll have to be by himself. I don’t think there’d be an inmate in the place that wouldn’t like to beat the crap out of him.  He could also get deported.

Deporting Bieber would be great. If he isn’t allowed to enter the USA again for a long time, that would ruin his concert tours. 

Truth be told, he is filthy rich, young, and doesn’t seem to have a clue about the seriousness of what he has done. Young kids NEED guidance, and I am hoping that the government gives Bieber some guidance by making him pay for what he has done.